"We just moved to a new house and Luke did an amazing job installing our home entertainment system. We thought we had a simple TV mounting project, but Luke was able to connect all our equipment (some of which was a bit outdated) so we have one seamless audio/visual system. Plus he was able to fix some errors that Comcast had made and willing to jump in and work on a few other small projects I needed done before the holidays. His price was reasonable and in the week since he performed the work I've had 2 people knowledgeble in contracting or wiring compliment the quality of his work."


Our certified premier plumbers provide 5-star service at a competitive price. Our huge selection of high quality plumbing replacement parts on our “Warehouse on Wheels” means most repairs can be made the same day.  Our certified premier plumbers are continually trained and qualified to work on all brands. Bonney is the place to call for your residential and commercial plumbing needs.
Galvanized steel potable water supply and distribution pipes are commonly found with nominal pipe sizes from 3⁄8 inch (9.5 mm) to 2 inches (51 mm). It is rarely used today for new construction residential plumbing. Steel pipe has National Pipe Thread (NPT) standard tapered male threads, which connect with female tapered threads on elbows, tees, couplers, valves, and other fittings. Galvanized steel (often known simply as "galv" or "iron" in the plumbing trade) is relatively expensive, and difficult to work with due to weight and requirement of a pipe threader. It remains in common use for repair of existing "galv" systems and to satisfy building code non-combustibility requirements typically found in hotels, apartment buildings and other commercial applications. It is also extremely durable and resistant to mechanical abuse. Black lacquered steel pipe is the most widely used pipe material for fire sprinklers and natural gas.
"Leak Chaser's Plumbing did a great job. I needed to get my new kitchen sink plumbing reconnected after getting new countertops installed and with an existing garbage disposal and new dishwasher. I thought that I could do it myself and save some money, but of course, I got in over my head. The charges were very reasonable and comparable to the other quotes. Nothing's free plumber's have to get their professional lincenses renewed annually at a costly fee like the rest of us in different professions. He was very professional and patience with me. I would recommend and hire them again. Shout out to the DIYers!"
For details about apprenticeship or other opportunities in this occupation, contact the offices of the state employment service; the state apprenticeship agency; local plumbing, heating, and cooling contractors or firms that employ fitters; or local union–management apprenticeship committees. Apprenticeship information is available from the U.S. Department of Labor's Apprenticeship program online, or by phone at 877-872-5627.
The word "plumber" dates from the Roman Empire.[3] The Latin for lead is plumbum. Roman roofs used lead in conduits and drain pipes[4] and some were also covered with lead, lead was also used for piping and for making baths.[5] In medieval times anyone who worked with lead was referred to as a plumber as can be seen from an extract of workmen fixing a roof in Westminster Palace and were referred to as plumbers "To Gilbert de Westminster, plumber, working about the roof of the pantry of the little hall, covering it with lead, and about various defects in the roof of the little hall".[6] Thus a person with expertise in working with lead was first known as a Plumbarius which was later shortened to plumber.
Present-day water-supply systems use a network of high-pressure pumps, and pipes in buildings are now made of copper,[26] brass, plastic (particularly cross-linked polyethylene called PEX, which is estimated to be used in 60% of single-family homes[27]), or other nontoxic material. Due to its toxicity, most cities moved away from lead water-supply piping by the 1920s in the United States,[28] although lead pipes were approved by national plumbing codes into the 1980s,[29] and lead was used in plumbing solder for drinking water until it was banned in 1986.[28] Drain and vent lines are made of plastic, steel, cast-iron, or lead.[30][31]
Garbage disposers usually come with an Allen key. Find a good place to store it, and when the disposer jams, you can follow the directions in the owner’s manual to fix it yourself. It’s as simple as inserting and twisting, and doing this yourself will save you the hassle and cash of a service call to the plumber. Speaking of tool storage, check out these clever tool storage ideas.

Rooter Repair Co Denver

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