Hawaii requires a licensed contractor for jobs exceeding $1,000.00 and/or requiring permits. Electrical and plumbing licenses are required for jobs involving those specific trades. General engineering contractors are needed for land leveling, sewers, excavations, and paving. General building contractors are needed for building structures such as additions and new construction.
Hi Kenneth, We would be happy to get you connected with a pro for your project. You can submit a service request on our website: http://www.homeadvisor.com/, or browse reviews for local water heater pros here: http://www.homeadvisor.com/c.html. We can also have a project advisor reach out to assist you if you send your contact information to [email protected] –HASupport

Wall thickness does not affect pipe or tubing size.[21] 1/2" L copper has the same outer diameter as 1/2" K or M copper. The same applies to pipe schedules. As a result, a slight increase in pressure losses is realized due to a decrease in flowpath as wall thickness is increased. In other words, 1 foot of 1/2" L copper has slightly less volume than 1 foot of 1/2 M copper.[citation needed]
Many trades are looking at a critical time because more people are retiring than entering the fields. Plumbing is just one of those trades facing similar issues. Many women thinking about going into trade professions may stay away from plumbing based on some stereotypical thoughts like, say, plumbers buttcrack (yes, it’s a thing), and the fact that it can be an exceptionally messy job (such as clogged toilets). However, many women in the plumbing field feel that they are treated very professionally by both their male co-workers and their clients.
Even the smallest leak can be costly and lead to potential long-term damage, and letting them go untouched will only further deteriorate your home. Whether you need emergency service or a check-up to determine the location of the leak, call the professionals at Mike Diamond. We’ll visually attempt to detect the leak in your plumbing and repair it the same day whenever possible.
“Don’t go to the Yellow Pages to find a plumber,” says Berkey’s Bill Stevens. “It’s like guessing lottery numbers. Anyone can make an appealing ad, but that doesn’t mean they are legitimate. In this industry, it’s easy for a plumber who develops a poor reputation to advertise under a different name. They come and go.” Even searching for someone online may end up being a scam using fake reviews. Instead, look for a plumber who is well-established in your community. Check the Better Business Bureau and read customer reviews at sites such as HomeAdvisor, Angie’s List, or Citysearch. Local contractors or plumbing fixture stores can also refer you to a quality plumber, according to Grady Daniel, who owns a plumbing company in Austin, Texas. “Most of these firms won’t work with bad plumbers.” Or simply ask your neighbors for a referral. A trusted plumber that consistently delivers quality service does not remain a secret for very long.

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